Entertainment Review TV Shows

Fresh Off ABC: Fresh Off The Boat

There's a new cool kid in the TV town, and you just might relate to him.

Ever felt like you didn’t belong because of cultural differences? Ever experienced being the new kid after moving to a school and environment where you knew absolutely nobody? Ever just need to laugh every, oh I don’t know, Tuesday? If you’ve answered yes to any of these three questions, you’re in luck. ABC’s new comedy sitcom airing every Tuesday, “Fresh Off the Boat” will get you going on laughing, relating, and binge-watching.

“Fresh Off the Boat”, a show based on the memoir of an American restaurateur, Eddie Huang, is sweeping the nation with it’s unique and hysterical plotline. The story is told through the eyes of young Eddie Huang (Hudson Yang), who is eleven years old. The story starts off with Eddie and the rest of his Taiwanese family, his father (Randall Park), mother (Constance Wu), two brothers, Emery (Forrest Wheeler) and Evan (Ian Chen), and his grandmother (Lucille Song), making their way from Washington D.C. to Orlando, Florida. His father decides to open up a restaurant there called Cattleman’s Ranch, in order to embrace the American Dream. After all, it’s all he has ever dreamed of, and he’s determined to take his whole family on the journey. Of course, there’s always the unhappy ones when moving. Eddie is scared about fitting in at his new school, and his mother complains that the humidity of Orlando is not good for her hair. Despite fears and difficulties, the Asian-American family tries their best to “blend in” even if it really doesn’t work out.

(ABC)
(ABC) 

Because the Huangs are seen as “foreigners” in their new, all-white neighborhood, many culture-clashes occur. Considered a minority, the family is stared at with the eyes of both curious and bewildered people. The show follows a non-white family trying to adapt to suburban, white culture in comedic and relatable ways, portraying the toughness of fitting in while being “different”. Eddie’s new neighbors and peers at school make fun of the Chinese food he brings for lunch, his last name that no one can pronounce correctly, and the way he looks. They even act surprised that his English is “good,” when in reality, he was born and raised in the United States.

 

 

Despite adversities, no one can stop Eddie and his family’s hike to the American dream. Still not convinced to watch this amazing show?

Check out some of the funniest moments from Fresh Off the Boat – when the show got too real.

 

White kids make fun of Eddie’s lunch:

We’ve probably all experienced this. People who are not of our culture getting surprised by so-called “exotic” food Asian people eat. What Eddie and his family consider normal, is not by those who have no knowledge about their culture. It’s human nature to be surprised when you see something abnormal that you’re not used to seeing everyday. However, instead of accepting diversities, the immature students at Eddie’s new school takes this to a whole new level by using it as an excuse to tease him about it. Being bullied about being different? TOO REAL.

 

Asian parents: Go big or go home

When Eddie is called a “chink” by a student in his new school, he lashes out inappropriate language that even the principal has never heard of (and he’s from Boston!). When the principal suggests a possible suspension taking place, instead of accepting the consequences, Eddie’s mother and father defend him by taking his side. Parents always on our side? TOO REAL.

 

“Too expensive”

 

When Eddie goes clothes shopping, his mother takes one look at the price tag and simply says, “too much”. When it comes to Asian stereotypes, one major one is that Asian people are cheap. I guess that’s not 100% false. We like to bargain and get the best of the best deals out there. That one look Eddie’s mother gave him when she saw the number on the price tag is TOO REAL… and too familiar.

 

There’s not a moment where you can’t relate to Eddie Huang. After all, we are living in an Asian society. Don’t miss out on the rest of the season! Laughs, giggles, smiles are guaranteed.

– Leona Mauryama (’17)
Header: ABC 

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